Hurricane Florence: What We Know So Far - DAILY UPDATES

Hurricane Florence: What We Know So Far

 Florence as a Category 3 hurricane at 16:30 UTC on September 5. Strong wind shear displaced all convection to the north and east of the circulation, rendering its surface circulation exposed.

Hurricane Florence aims for the Carolinas

Officials expect the hurricane to approach the Southeastern US coast on Thursday. You can track it here.
Officials will release an updated forecast at 5 p.m. ET. 

Brock Long, who is a senior official at Federal Emergency Management Agency, urged residents in the path of Hurricane Florence to heed all warnings.

This is set out to be a devastating event." The storm surge has triggered evacuation orders.

Traffic appeared light in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, but the area’s congressman believes that’s because a mass exit has already taken place. 

“They’re going to be on their own if they stay,” said South Carolina Rep. Tom Rice.
READ: Hurricanes Florence, Isaac And Helene Churn In The Atlantic As Hurricane Season Intensifies

Disaster Relief

Trump: I expect Congress to approve disaster relief.

Trump: "We are totally prepared" for Hurricane Florence
President Trump just had a meeting with the Department of Homeland Security and Federal Emergency Management Agency officials as Hurricane Florence continues to barrel toward the East Coast.

South Carolina congressman: Hurricane Florence is a "beast and it is headed right at us"
South Carolina Rep. Tom Rice is not sticking around for Hurricane Florence to make landfall.

Jim Darling and his parrot, Maximus, are planning to ride out the massive Category 4 storm, which is expected to hit the Carolinas Thursday.

"I'd rather just be at home, then stuck in a hotel somewhere," he told CNN on Tuesday while he was out shopping for supplies in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.

Forecasts generally project the storm to make landfall between northern South Carolina and North Carolina’s Outer Banks as a strong Category 3  on Thursday, although shifts in the track are possible and storm impacts will expand great distances beyond where landfall occurs.


In The Headlines:


Hurricane Florence: Watches posted as 'extremely dangerous' Florence churns toward Carolinas

September 11 at 9:05 AM Florence continued its path toward the East Coast overnight Monday, maintaining its monstrous Category 4 storm status and 140-mph winds. The National Hurricane Center is calling the storm "extremely dangerous," and predicts it could still strengthen to near Category 5 intensity on Tuesday.

Hurricane Florence aims for the Carolinas: Live updates

What we're covering here What we're covering here Hurricane Florence: The Category 4 storm has its sights set on the Carolinas. Track the storm: The hurricane is expected to approach the Southeastern US coast on Thursday. You can track it here. The next forecast: Officials will release an updated forecast at 5 p.m.

Dangerous Category 4 Hurricane Florence likely to stall and pound Carolinas, Virginia for days

All interests along the coasts of the Southeast and mid-Atlantic are being put on alert for a potential strike from Category 4 Hurricane Florence during the second half of the week. At this time, AccuWeather Founder and President Dr. Joel N.

Hurricane Florence: How much rain could fall? Models suggest Harvey-like totals are possible

While there remains some uncertainty around Hurricane Florence 's exact path, one thing does seem certain: it will dump potentially historic rainfall amounts. The latest rainfall potential map issued by the National Weather Service Weather Prediction Center shows a portion of North Carolina receiving in excess of 20 inches of rain.

Hurricane Florence grows in size, tropical depression likely in Gulf

UPDATE 2 p.m.: Hurricane Florence maintained 130 mph wind speeds this afternoon, but is getting better organized and growing in size. National Hurricane Center forecasters during the intermediate 2 p.m. advisory said hurricane-force winds have expanded outward up to 60 miles with tropical storm-force winds reaching out 170 miles from the storm's center.

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